Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America.  As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Meet the Production Team:

Anita Casalina: Producer/Director

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

Scott Peterson:  Producer

Scott Peterson is a writer, director, and sound designer in San Francisco, CA. He began his career as on-air host and Assistant Production Director at KGRG FM in Auburn, WA before relocating to attend San Francisco State University. During his time there, Scott was nominated for multiple awards including Best Undergraduate writer in 2015. He was also honored with a second place win for Scriptwriting – Best Webisode at the 2014 BEA Festival of Media Arts.

 

Before working with World Changers, Scott served his community by volunteering as a reading mentor through San Diego public schools. His current focus is creating content that entertains and motivates the audience to be more deeply connected and involved to social and systemic issues within their communities and the world at large.

Abhi Singh: Director of Photography

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

Karen Everett:  Story Editor

As the Founder of New Doc Editing, Karen's primary focus is making influential, transformational documentaries that "evolve consciousness and improve the human condition." She does this by directing her own documentaries and helping other visionary filmmakers structure their stories to create films that are riveting and inspiring.

 

She is considered one of the world's leading documentary story consultants. She has advised hundreds of filmmakers and her visionary leadership and deep understanding of narrative structure has helped many filmmakers get their documentaries screened at Sundance, PBS, HBO, and other top documentary venues.

We can all be a part of the healing process.

Click Here for Imaginary Walls NEWS

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America.

As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Click Here to Visit Our Fundraising Page!

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Click Here for

Imaginary Walls NEWS

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need

feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

Scott Peterson is a writer, director, and sound designer in San Francisco, CA. He began his career as on-air host and Assistant Production Director at KGRG FM in Auburn, WA before relocating to attend San Francisco State University. During his time there, Scott was nominated for multiple awards including Best Undergraduate writer in 2015. He was also honored with a second place win for Scriptwriting – Best Webisode at the 2014 BEA Festival of Media Arts.

 

Before working with World Changers, Scott served his community by volunteering as a reading mentor through San Diego public schools. His current focus is creating content that entertains and motivates the audience to be more deeply connected and involved to social and systemic issues within their communities and the world at large.

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

As the Founder of New Doc Editing, Karen's primary focus is making influential, transformational documentaries that "evolve consciousness and improve the human condition." She does this by directing her own documentaries and helping other visionary filmmakers structure their stories to create films that are riveting and inspiring.

 

She is considered one of the world's leading documentary story consultants. She has advised hundreds of filmmakers and her visionary leadership and deep understanding of narrative structure has helped many filmmakers get their documentaries screened at Sundance, PBS, HBO, and other top documentary venues.

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

We can all be a part of the healing process.

Click Here to Visit Our Fundraising Page!

Click Here for

Imaginary Walls NEWS

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Meet the Production Team:

Anita Casalina:

Producer/Director

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization

became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

Scott Peterson: Producer

Scott Peterson is a writer, director, and sound designer in San Francisco, CA. He began his career as on-air host and Assistant Production Director at KGRG FM in Auburn, WA before relocating to attend San Francisco State University. During his time there, Scott was nominated for multiple awards including Best Undergraduate writer in 2015. He was also honored with a second place win for Scriptwriting – Best Webisode at the 2014 BEA Festival of Media Arts.

 

Before working with World Changers, Scott served his community by volun-

teering as a reading mentor through San Diego public schools. His current focus is creating content that entertains and motivates the audience to be more deeply connected and involved to social and systemic issues within their communities and the world at large.

Abhi Singh:

Director of Photography

 

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte

International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

Karen Everett: Story Editor

As the Founder of New Doc Editing, Karen's primary focus is making influential, transformational documentaries that "evolve consciousness and improve the human condition." She does this by directing her own documentaries and helping other visionary filmmakers structure their stories to create films that are riveting and inspiring.

She is considered one of the world's leading documentary story consultants. She has advised hundreds of filmmakers and her visionary leadership and deep under-

standing of narrative structure has helped many filmmakers get their documentaries screened at Sundance, PBS, HBO, and other top documentary venues.

We can all be a part of the

healing process.

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial

prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

 

Scott Peterson is a writer, director, and sound designer in San Francisco, CA. He began his career as on-air host and Assistant Production Director at KGRG FM in Auburn, WA before relocating to attend San Francisco State University. During his time there, Scott was nominated for multiple awards including Best Undergraduate writer in 2015. He was also honored with a second place win for Scriptwriting – Best Web

-isode at the 2014 BEA Festival of Media Arts.

 

Before working with World Changers, Scott served his community by volunteering as a reading mentor through San Diego public schools. His current focus is creating content that entertains and motivates the audience to be more deeply connected and involved to social and systemic issues within their communities and the world at large.

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at

several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

As the Founder of New Doc Editing, Karen's primary focus is making influential, trans-formational documentaries that "evolve consciousness and improve the human condition." She does this by directing her own documentaries and helping other visionary filmmakers structure their stories to create films that are riveting and inspiring.

She is considered one of the

world's leading documentary story consultants. She has advised hundreds of filmmakers and her visionary leadership and deep under-standing of narrative structure has helped many filmmakers get their documentaries screened at Sundance, PBS, HBO, and other top documentary venues.

We can all be a part of the healing process.

Racism is a complex issue and at times seems irreparable. Imaginary Walls is a feature length documentary that explores how one couple in Oakland, California has successfully helped people move beyond racism in their own lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working from their modest Attitudinal Healing Connection center, Kokomon and Aeeshah Clottey lead "racial healing circles," where very diverse groups of people gather, with the specific intention of discussing their experiences and feelings about race. Aeeshah and Kokomon provide an environment that is safe, open-minded, and free from judgment. They stress that racism is a construct of an ill society; a mass delusion, and no one need feel guilt or shame about what they have felt or done in the past. The past is just that: past. It can be released, let go, and participants can move forward in their lives.

 

Imaginary Walls explores this racial healing process and why it has worked for so many people both here in the US and in the other healing centers Aeeshah and Kokomon have helped found in Asia, Africa, Mexico, and South America. As we look closely at the success of these racial healing circles, we explore the personal life journeys of Aeeshah and Kokomon, painting intimate portraits of who they are, how they met later in life and what drew them to this work. We also build detailed portrayals of two healing circle participants - Bayon Simmons, who is Caucasian woman, and Guillermo Hernandez, a Hispanic man.

 

Even as this important story shares how two people have dedicated their lives to healing the racism that plagues our society at the deepest level, perhaps even more valuable is its potential to change all of us. This film will engage the audience and inspire them to find a new outlook on their own lives and feelings. It could be the "crack" in those imaginary walls that helps us all to topple them forever. By supporting this film, you are supporting the idea that we can all have a healthier, happier state of mind. We can all find a larger sense of community, and evolve toward a better world together.

Award-winning Producer and Director Anita Casalina is an Oakland native who has worked in the Civil Rights Movement and media all her life. In 2014, Anita co-founded World Changers Entertainment, building a television show highlighting stories of transformation and poverty alleviation.

 

In her lifetime, Anita has witnessed great progress on the issues of racism and discrimination. Yet the re-emergence of deeply held racial prejudice and the resulting hate crimes showed her that we still have a long distance to travel before our society is fair and equitable. That realization

became the driving force for her to produce the film Imaginary Walls. By lifting up the Racial Healing Circles approach, the film will help to cross the long-held divides among groups of people who need to find common ground and build a future big enough to hold all of us.

 

Email: anitacasalina@gmail.com

 

Scott Peterson is a writer, director, and sound designer in San Francisco, CA. He began his career as on-air host and Assistant Production Director at KGRG FM in Auburn, WA before relocating to attend San Francisco State University. During his time there, Scott was nominated for multiple awards including Best

Undergraduate writer in 2015. He was also honored with a second place win for Scriptwriting – Best Webisode at the 2014 BEA Festival of Media Arts.

 

Before working with World Changers, Scott served his community by volunteering as a reading mentor through San Diego public schools. His current focus is creating content that entertains and motivates the audience to be more deeply connected and involved to social and systemic issues within their communities and the world at large.

 

 

Abhi Singh is a filmmaker based in San Francisco. His recent short film No Vacancy profiles artists affected by the housing crises in San Francisco and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary Short at the Asian Film Festival of Dallas in 2017. Prior to that, he worked on a series of short films for KQED Arts. Bay Area

Ballerina, a short film produced, shot and edited by Abhi, featuring Miko Fogarty was nominated for a 2016 Webby Award. His work has screened at several international film festivals including Sheffield Doc/Fest (UK), FIPA- Festival International de Programmes Audiovisuels (France), Sehsuchte International Film Festival (Germany), Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, (Sebastopol, California), Documentary Film Festival, Independent Film Festival Boston, and the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.

 

Abhi graduated with an MFA from the Documentary Film and Video Program at Stanford University.

 

For more of Abhi's work and contact information, please visit www.abhisinghsf.com.

As the Founder of New Doc Editing, Karen's primary focus is making influential, transformational documentaries that "evolve consciousness and improve the human condition." She does this by directing her own documentaries and helping other visionary filmmakers structure their stories to create

films that are riveting and inspiring.

 

She is considered one of the world's leading documentary story consultants. She has advised hundreds of filmmakers and her visionary leadership and deep under-standing of narrative structure has helped many filmmakers get their documentaries screened at Sundance, PBS, HBO, and other top documentary venues.

We can all be a part of the healing process.